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A service for food industry professionals · Wednesday, May 23, 2018 · 448,321,949 Articles · 3+ Million Readers

A Subset of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Cases May be Related to Allergic Reactions to Food Items

SKIN: The Journal of Cutaneous Medicine(TM), Utility of Food Patch Testing in the Evaluation and Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

While further research is needed, this data suggests that patch testing and resultant dietary modification may be effective in reducing symptoms in patients who carry a diagnosis of IBS.”
— Grace Shin, MD
NEW YORK, NY, UNITED STATES, March 12, 2018 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common cause of morbidity, accounting for up to 50% of primary care visits associated with a gastrointestinal complaint. Despite its pervasiveness, the cause of IBS is not well-understood.

A new article published today in SKIN: The Journal of Cutaneous Medicine(TM) tests the hypothesis that at least a subset of IBS cases may actually be related to allergic reactions related to contact of the GI tract wall with allergens in foods. This notion was spurred by the observation that over half of IBS patients report worsening symptoms intake of certain foods.

Grace Shin, MD, and coauthors tested this hypothesis by performing allergy testing to an extensive panel of food allergens on 60 patients with IBS symptoms. Following the testing, food avoidance diets directed at the results of the patch testing were implemented. Patients were followed for improvement in symptoms.

The authors found that 83.3% of patients reported improvement in their IBS symptoms one month after implementation of allergy test-directed food avoidance, with improvement persisting beyond three months in the majority of cases.

The results support the existence of a newly proposed disease, allergic contact enteritis, which is likely responsible for the symptoms in at least a portion of patients diagnosed with IBS. “Dietary avoidance of trigger foods identified by patch testing may offer a cost effective, non-pharmacologic approach to treat patients who carry this diagnosis,” says Shin. While further research is needed, this data suggests that patch testing and resultant dietary modification may be effective in reducing symptoms in patients who carry a diagnosis of IBS.

SKIN: The Journal of Cutaneous Medicine(TM) is a peer-reviewed online medical journal that is the official journal of The National Society for Cutaneous Medicine. The mission of SKIN is to provide an enhanced and accelerated route to disseminate new dermatologic knowledge for all aspects of cutaneous disease.

For more details please visit www.jofskin.org or contact jofskin@gmail.com.

(DOI: 10.25251/skin.2.2.2)

Link to article

Editors’ Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Michael B. Stierstorfer, MD
East Penn Dermatology, PC
215-557-7430
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